The Intelligence from The Economist - Transcripts

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Get a daily burst of global illumination from The Economist’s worldwide network of correspondents as they dig past the headlines to get to the stories beneath—and to stories that aren’t making headlines, but should be.

00:24:55

The Intelligence from The Economist Tax brakes: Britain’s PM contenders on the economy Tax brakes: Britain’s PM contenders on t...
As a clear lead hardens and the appointment of a new prime minister looms, both contenders are making noises about cutting taxes. But would either have a firm grip on the country’s long-term woes? The vast makeover of Ethiopia’s capital city—despite a grinding civil war—is an idealised vision of the country’s future. And figuring out why thinking hard is so exhausting. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

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00:26:10

The Intelligence from The Economist The WY and the wherefore: Liz Cheney’s loss The WY and the wherefore: Liz Cheney’s l...
Wyoming’s sole representative in the House, once a Republican leading light and now a pariah for her views on Donald Trump, has been ousted from Congress. We attend her election-night defeat. The science behind behavioural nudges seems to be on increasingly shaky ground. And investigating the UAE’s questionable plans to make more rain. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

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00:22:03

The Intelligence from The Economist Class action: Kenya gets a new president Class action: Kenya gets a new president
The names are familiar but the establishment-choice and rabble-rouser roles are reversed. That the vote was along class lines rather than ethnicity marks an important shift. Will the result stand? For years Mexico was seen merely as a conduit for illegal drugs; now it has a growing user base as well. And the rising number of Americans bringing guns onto flights. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

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00:23:20

The Intelligence from The Economist Poorer, hungrier, safer? Afghanistan one year on Poorer, hungrier, safer? Afghanistan one...

Rights for women and girls have regressed by decades; the economy is cratering. Yet, for many rural Afghans, things are actually better than they were before America scarpered. Silicon Valley types once righteously spurned the military-industrial establishment—now they’re queuing up to fund defence startups. And the surprising truth about the most famous scene in “Bambi”, which is turning 80.

For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer



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00:26:15

The Intelligence from The Economist Crimea punishment: A Russian airfield in ruins Crimea punishment: A Russian airfield in...

The airbase in Crimea lies in ruins. Ukraine hasn’t claimed credit, many suspect they carried out the daring attack more than 100 miles behind enemy lines. Our defence editor explains why the war has entered a new phase. Why state-owned firms, not oil supermajors, are the biggest impediment to a green-energy transition. And pondering the pleasures of barbecue.


For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer


Our GDPR privacy policy was updated on August 8, 2022. Visit acast.com/privacy for more information.

00:24:10

The Intelligence from The Economist Teflon Don: Trump’s legal woes Teflon Don: Trump’s legal woes

Donald Trump endured an FBI raid, questioning in a civil lawsuit and an adverse court ruling, all in 48 hours. But at least in the short-term, he’s making political hay from his legal woes. Why Apple’s future increasingly rests on services rather than just hardware. And how France is coping with a mustard shortage.


For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer


Our GDPR privacy policy was updated on August 8, 2022. Visit acast.com/privacy for more information.